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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but the fact he was not speaking optimistically about the economy and the effects of qe3 on the economy sent a damper on the stocks. a nice way to begin the day with 75 up on the dow, 3.6 on the s&p, and, again, nasdaq is the only one in the red. lauren: sometimes the fed tie doesn't list everything. silver ending at seven month highs. look at that. david: oil, a little of a rise, natural gas, though, we want to focus on natural gas because we have seen that thing grow for the past month or so. it was up 5% today. if you're looking for some play in energy, oil seems a little too hectic for you, go to natural gas. with ce get -- can we get that up there? okay. switch to airlines. lauren: they are seeing a pop today. as you see, there was a report out earlier saying the outlook for the airline industry is improving. that's a good sign. look at that. up arrows across the board. david: ibm, you knew it was a pick when warren buffet went in there. today, look at this, an all time 10-year high at the top there trading at $210.43 per share. that was a 1.5% jump today. a nice big move by ibm. fed ch
that will be the headline on thursday morning? probably not. the debate is supposed to focus on the economy, a tough subject for the president. minutes from now, another report on manufacturing and it's likely to confirm an economy on the verge of recession. contrary to media reports, governor romney's campaign is not dead. a rasmussen poll gives him an edge among voters who will definitely vote and see his tracking poll of likely voters first on this program minutes from now. no letup in tax the rich mania. the u.n. takes aim at the richer people in america and europeans riot again to make them pay for, well, for everything. and then there is this, the european beat americans at golf again. but cheer up, "varney & company" is about to begin. >> good morning, "varney & company," today is monday october the 1st. wednesday is the first presidential debate and the obama campaign spent the weekend trying to low up media expectations that the president's already won. most mainstream polls do indeed have president obama in the lead, but according to rasmussen, governor romney has an edge among certain voters. 43
to do something like this? >> i think it would be a reference back. because the economy takes all the oxygen out of the election with a little bit of foreign affairs, the supreme court does not play against undecided voters. it is a motivator to get out and get to the polls. you want this person to replace justice ginsberg when she retires for example. you want to know if there's any practical experience, and the obama at the lustration has declined to defend the defense of marriage act. present romney might decide he would defend the constitutionality of that statute. it does seem like that has a lot of salience and presidential debates. i.t. think it will not happen. here is why. no major national political figure has attacked as publicly since 1996 or before. it is remarkable. the republicans were seeing some political profit in attacking affirmative action given the polls. they do not do it anymore. john kerry said maybe it is time to stop these racial preferences. the democratic leadership council was inching down that road. that is all gone. this is why we get so demonized i
for life, and until last july he was italy's minister of economy and finance. but he is not exactly a politician. as a respect economist considered be abo party politics he was chosen to form a new technocratic government. it put him at the center of the european debt crisis confronting rising interest rates that led to greece, ireland, and portugal to seek bailouts. his ability to turn calamity into opportunity has revived his nickname "super mario." i have pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. welcome. >> delighted to be here. >> rose: i see that you have said that you're not going to run for pri minister? >> no, i can confirm that i will not be a candidate. i believe i couldn't even be a candidate because, as you mentioned, i am senator for life. so candidates are candidates inn order to become members of parliament. >> rose: and you're senator for life. >> yes. >> rose: do you want to stay as prime minister? >> of course i will not. i will-- the whole government will have to resign when the elections take place, probably next-- after that, it will be for th
the rest of the economy has started to feel the effect from the sluggish manufacturing sector. if you look at the breakdown of the services pmi, the construction services sub index -- meanwhile, new orders were dragged lower by demand weakness for transportation. over in australia, a survey showed an even grimmer picture as its services index dipped to 41.9 in september. india reports its all important services pmi tomorrow, while hsbc is out next monday. that's all from me. >> thank you very much. >>> coming up on today's show, we head to paris to find out more, the attempts to offload his unit. then to hong kong where we examine the political transition in china plagued by scandals and disappearances. we get an expert view on the new leadership change. >>> and next, washington and its debate tonight as romney and obama finally square off. we'll have a preview of what to expect and what's at stake with our very own democrat-republican panel. >>> and real estate is on the rise. we head to new york with founder barbara corcoran. mariano rajoy has denied reports that spain will request a bai
of the economy, and if that stops jobs are going to stop, too and so is everything else. >> larry, i think those are very good points. i would argue most of the weakness we are seeing in the manufacturing side is a function of much weaker export s because of weakness in europe and asia. i think what we are seeing in the latest chicago data is a catchup with all the other weakness we had seen in earlier surveys. i think the economy is weak. it's not strong by any means but the labor market looks like it is growing. i don't think it will rollover from modest job growth. claims are ploe low and tax receipts are improving. >> 1 30i7b 3% depend we got earlier this weak. a lot of people would call ate growth recession. i want to ask is this stall-speed or an actual recession? >> i think we have slowed since the 1.3% second quarter number larry. we are seeing durable goods orders down in july and august. we are seeing the pmi is down. importantly, europe is moving in to a recession. germany is now in recession and china is not doing its stimulus. you have a coordinated global slow down starts now and i
. the economy is obviously a big part of this story. the qe announcement providing a shock to stock. we'll talk to charlie evans at 8:30 eastern time. and then it is your money, your vote. we'll start the countdown to the first presidential tee batd, that is on wednesday night. we'll be turning to a pair of political strategists in the next half hour for a preview. plus a cnbc exclusive, julia boars sten catching up with sheryl sandberg. including just how many people put everything about themselves online. >> does it scare that you you've helped create a generation of oversharers? >> i think what we give is people the ability to share what they want. what is one person's ridiculous oversharing is another person's regular day and we build technology that lets users share what they want to share and that's tremendously exciting. >> julia will join us with more of that conversation coming up at 7:30. and we'll find out why craig barrett is not a facebook fan. and in sports news, yes, europe has retained the ryder cup. staging a comeback after the u.s. began sunday with a big lead. europe has won
while consumer prices slipped further in august raising fears the world's third biggest economy could yet fall into recession by year end. >>> what a big day. >> super friday. >> we have the french budget proposal, the results of the spain audit/stress test, we've got, what else -- it's the end of the quarter. britain is announcing it libor reforms. >> that's not what i was talking about. it's the ryder cup, folks. forget all that stuff. >> by the way, i had to google the ryder cup. >> far more important event. >> we'll talk about that later in the program. >> i don't know who insisted on that, but apparently we are going to cover it. >> before we get to that, the government of hollande is about to present it first budget. its expected to whicheverdelives of tax hikes. meantime european policymakers are appraising spain's reform plan. but today the government must brace for the results of the banking stress tests that will determine the recapitalization needs of the country's most troubled lenders. we have steve sedgwick following the story in thmadrid, but firs out to stefane i
's economy is dead flat, teetering on recession. 10-year high for unemployment and france puts in place huge tax increases. bill: i'm reading the two measures bringing around half a billion euros. >> that's it. >> what will that do for them? >> not much. there are other taxes as well which will bring in a total they think of 20 billion euros. bill: higher tax rates on dividends? >> dividends, capital gains, dividends, profits, reinvestment of capital, interest you name it. bill: here is a query for you. are they cutting spending at all? >> by about $10 billion euros. $20 billion worth of tax increases. $10 billion worth of spending cuts gives you a 30 billion euro reduction they think in the budget deficit. bill: well on the spending cuts, how much resistance was there? >> there is going to be a lot of resistance. in france there is really a cradle to grave security system and the state is at the very center of the economy. when the state starts cutting into to spending, cutting down on spending, there will be some resistance and it will be seen on the streets. bill: do you expect the wealth
of divided germany and the beginning of a new germany that would grow to become europe's largest economy. as he continued his speech coming he said the germans had shown tremendous solidarity toward one another. he said a similar effort must be made on the process of european integration. >> only in europe, working with our neighbors and partners in this community, can we, and will we, be able to achieve our common goals, as they are described in our national anthem, unity, justice, and freedom. >> it was a message of hope in the face of mounting economic and social tensions across the european union. >> 31 people are dead in the syrian city of aleppo after a suicide bombing in the government controlled part of the city. >> aleoppo has been a major battleground. the two sides seemed to be deadlocked. >> deep craters in the crate a huge amount of explosives was used in this attack. months of warfare have reduced the once magnificent buildings in the square to ruins. wednesday's explosions ripped through a military office club and a hotel. it is caught most of those killed were government
. that's what's happening now, coming to grips with their economy is going to be horrendous for a long time. >> thank you very much. i'm sure we'll check back with you later this morning. >>> we have to go? really? we do? all right. coming up, this football stuff. >> we'll get into some of this. >> today's national weather forecast. in sports, another team clinches a major league baseball playoff spot. but pointless, really. going to lose to the reds one way or another. >>> both president obama and mitt romney will be in ohio today. the story behind that swing state. >>> welcome back. take a look and you'll see that the dow futures are slightly higher. s&p futures up by close to two and a half. this comes after the market ended on its weakest levels of the day yesterday. yesterday was the worst day for the month of september for the dow. it was the worst day in two months for the nasdaq and it was the worst day in three months for the s&p 500. all of that kind of playing out overseas as well. in europe this morning, you are going to see some red arrows. a lot of concern about what's ha
and they can't do anything other than use the central government to force the economy to do x and y. and they're trying to get away from that. as they move away from it, that part of the economy clearly shows some struggles. >> short the aussie dollar, what, long the mexican peso? >> mexico is one of the big winners because they're deliberately raising wages. so low value added chinese manufacturing is nowhere near as competitive in the world as it once was. you see evidence of the u.s. getting some of it back. so mexico sort of had its breakfast, lunch and dinner the past 20 years by china appearing on the scene is probably in the early stages of regaining some of that a. so i think mexico is a big winner. southeast asia, philippines, for example. >> all right. jim, stick around. more to come from you. let's get over to asia and get a wrap of the day over there. >> thanks, ross. asian markets were mostly higher buoyed by improved data in u.s. and europe and also the rba rate cut. surprising move from the central bank helped the australian market end at a five month high. resources and banks
a red flag for the economy. we'll talk more about the transports and what they're telling us at 6:40. we'll also focus on the economy with the man who is charged with officially calling recessions and the end of those recessions. james poterba will be here at 7:30. and our corporate story of the morning, smartphones and mobile devices. apple launches the new iphone 5 in 22 more countries today and this comes after blackberry posted better than expected quarterly results after the bell last night. still, it is an uphill climb for this company. we'll be talking to research in motion ceo. and plus we will welcome today's political news maker, senator rand paul, one of the nation's best known tea party members. and by the way, in case you went to sleep early last night, the official nfl refs were back on the field. get this, they got a standing ovation as they took the field. the ravens beating the browns 23-16. we will have more on the game and on what's happening in sports at 6:20 eastern time. first andrew has the morning's top business headlines. >>> on the global markets agenda, results
to change the mood. business confidence in the world's third biggest economy continues to take a hit. sentiment fell in the july to september quarter. this according to the central bank's survey. falling output and exports have taken a toll along with rising worries over strained relations with china. the one bright spot, the mood in the service sector which remains much higher. japan also has a new finance chief after noda reshuffled his cabinet. largely expected to stick to the reform plan. in all ten new faces were brought into the cabinet including the economics minister and he's been urging the bank of japan to take more action, as well, on the economy. ed rogers is ceo of rogers investment advisers and he joins us now. ed, was that one bright spot in the tank enough? >> good morning, ross. i think actually there were two bright spots. cap ex- is expected to rise at much higher rate than previously expected. those are good things. the fact that in the short term we have a bit of a down tick in enthusiasm and a lot of that could well be placed at the doorstep of the china and jap
the economy. when we announced qe-3, those were exactly the conversation we were having on the point, but still the market rallied and later on down the line, you rationalize it as the initial event wasn't so powerful. now we're doing exactly the same in europe. every time we go through this process. >> let's take an attendance call. volumes are still considerably low. today is a holiday. last week we had a significant holiday in the u.s. attendance is just low. there's not the kind of participation. so if you get something like that that spooks a few participants who actually are in the market, it's going to have a more profound effect and you'll see a percent and a half pullback. >> where do you stand on the notion that there's going to be a chase for performance in the fourth quarter and therefore will want to be in this market, putting sort of a floor underneath? >> that's a legitimate concern for people who aren't fully invested, but up to where they should be in terms of risk on with their portfolios. i do see there's considerable amount of risk to have that continue to push ag
under some of the strongest sanctions today. oil exports have been correct. the iranian economy has been hit hard. it does have an effect on the economy. we must face the truth. sanctions have not stopped iran's nuclear program. according to the international atomic energy agency, during the last year alone, iran has doubled the number of energy uses in its underground nuclear facility. at this late hour, there is only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting atomic bombs, and that is by placing a clear nucleare on iran's weapons program. [applause] red lines do not lead to war. they prevent war. look at nato's charter. it made clear that an attack on one member country would be considered an attack on all. new's redlined helps keep the peace in europe for nearly half a century -- red lines have helped keep the peace in europe for nearly half a century. and help preserve the peace for decades. it is the failure to place red lines that has often invited aggression. if it were drawn in the 1930 baltimore, world war ii might the been avoided -- 1930's, world war ii might have been av
. >> one market that they're particularly excited about is saudi arabia, the region's largest economy. we keep talking about the risks that come from swings in oil prices at least for the audi economy. and stability in the country. he says that's not really the biggest risk. at least not from a brush capital perspective. >> for the start, we have a business in the country, a large group of investors and they're focused in development. the issues are not about whether or not the economic opportunities are there. i think they are. i think saudi arabia and in terms of individual sectors, they'll perform extremely well. it's about the politics, not the economy. i think the people generally speaking are quite happy with the stimulus package and with the political system. >> tensions indeed remain high especially in some towns in the eastern province of the kingdom. of course we also got a start on the broader concept and developments in the arab spring. why he chose india over china when it comes to their broader investment strategy. and of course we'll talk about the art of private equity, as
getting schooled in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse that, to offset is use the political system to get that result. in the political system, we can rearrange so what was lost in the economics is indicated more and more unequal is recouped by using politics. where the majority votes, where the majority rules is a perfectly logical way of thinking. and this has occurred to the rich as well. and to the corporations as well. so the more the system produces inequality, the more urgent it becomes for those benefiting from the inequality capitalism producers to control the politics because the alternative would be good. they're not going to do that. they're not going to allow the political system to function undoes what they have achieved in their mind in the economic system. they're not going to do that. see you can watch as america becomes more and more unequal, then it becomes necessary for politics to become more and more dependent on the money, dependent on the corporations to provide contributions to the economy, to the party more important than those things, the army of lobbyist
to be the worst month of the year historically. we know the global economy is weakening. everybody came on our air saying hey. short the global economy. this did not turn out to be such a good theory did it? right now, 2.9% for one of the best months of the year. not the best month but among the better months of the year. what were the two biggest gains we had this month? the two biggest days? september 6th? that was the day draghi announced the bond buying program. biggest gain. second biggest gain september 13th the day of the fomc meeting. what does this tell us? it tells us what matters in the world is central bank intervention and also what's going on in europe. what was the worst day this year? it was tuesday, the day we saw the riots in madrid because that's the day everybody said uh-oh. this whole deal with spain and this careful choreography moving toward help from the eu could fall apart. turns out maybe it's holding together a little better than anticipated. my point is what moves the world is central bank intervention and what's going on in europe. to play against that is very, very da
had expected. that suggests the economy may not be so hot, right? >> set the stage. we just downgrade the second quarter. we went from 1.7 to 1.3. we talked about that yesterday. >> this i consistent with that. >> exactly. we thought third quarter might have a two handle on it. we're taking that two handle off. before i came on goldman sachs has a report saying they're looking at 1.9. i see some over 1.8, 1.7. slow mediocre growth continues. i think the key being, can we resolve the issues that have hung over the american economy from spain? >> is madrid more important than chicago? >> at least it is today. we wanted to see what the needs would be for the spanish banks. the numbers that they put out today after this exhaustive examination. >> do you breath numbers? >> the market believes them now. they came about in line with expectations. the number could change depending on what happens with the spanish economy and if real estate prices fall even further. you think more of this like a tradeoff. if the capital requirements had been even bigger it would have meant they were going to c
apparatus, political dimension is making us forget the economy factors. there would be no democracy in the region if we don't have economic stability. to open up countries or open the market is something we know in africa. happened before. to deal with the arab world as we are very happy these people are for justice and we don't care which kind of political and economic policy for new positioning we get in the global economy which is very naive and we have to be cautious with this. we were dealing with this, something which is not as easy as this. it is if i have to talk about an intellectual revolution that is changing and we have to cope with this and hope the new generation are going to start from there. this is the beginning of the book and also saying hosni mubarak didn't know what was happening that -- many people were arrested because they were in the west and they were arrested. they knew something was happening. the american ambassador sent a note to the american government saying there are young people who want to get to the hosni mubarak regime before september of 2011 so
banks. this from the third quarter of 2010 shows a much different economy. back to you. melissa: interesting. thank you so much for the six a headline that generated all kinds of surprises. apple apologizing for it map app. the ceo tim cook says the company is doing everything it can to make maps better. you can use alternatives by downloading maps. what? melissa: that is crazy. that is like we have a problem with our signal, please go over to our competitor. lori: silence, i think says more. dennis: remember when they had the intended debacle. not admitting anything was wrong with it and people were getting more and more frustrated. lori: that is a good point. i think charlie gasparino is standing by with his latest report. inc. of america, i guess this is more interesting to charlie, at least. the bank with a 3.5 million in charges. bank of america says this is not an admission of guilt. the settlement was reached to eliminate the uncertainties. melissa: the latest news from bank of america that pain is still being felt from the collapse of 2008. charlie gasparino is first to
, and the stability of the global economy. it risks triggering a nuclear- arms race in the region, and the unraveling of the non- proliferation treaty. that's why a coalition of countries is holding the iranian government accountable. and that's why the united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. we know from painful experience that the path to security and prosperity does not lie outside the boundaries of international law and respect for human rights. that's why this institution was established from the rubble of conflict. that is why liberty triumphed over tyranny in the cold war. and that is the lesson of the last two decades as well. history shows that peace and progress come to those who make the right choices. nations in every part of the world have traveled this difficult path. europe, the bloodiest battlefield of the 20th century, is united, free and at peace. from brazil to south africa, from turkey to south korea, from india to indonesia, people of different races, religions, and traditions have lifted millions out of poverty, while respecting the ri
factor in how this whole economy shapes up. going you there the holidays they will -- okay, do you have a question there? melissa: i did because i don't understand. it is not like they're going to stop delivering mail if they run out of money. they're not just fund out postage. they have a giant debt to the treasury, a huge line of credit. they're defaulting on debt they have now. they continue to get loans. they run out of cash not like they will shut the door on your customers and your customers will have to lay off all their workers, right? >> part of the problem they have to make this $5.5 billion payment for the prefunding of health care. they have got to make another payment here shortly in september for the retirement funds. another $5 billion. they're just not going to make those payments. they will not have enough cash going through the system to make this payment at this time. what they're going to do is they will move things around, close facilities faster than they had allegedly told us they were going to do it. so it disrupts the whole distribution system of the mailing pro
court, because the economy takes all the oxygen out of the election with a little bit of foreign affairs, the supreme court does not play among undecided voters could but it is a motivator for one space to get out and get to the polls because you want this person to replace justice ginsburg when she retires, for example. and health care is really the only thing that resonates. if there is any possible outcome is that the obama administration has declined to defend the defense of marriage act. and governor romney may well decide that he would defend the constitutionality of that statute could but it does not seem that that kind of social conservative question has a lot of salience in something like a presidential debate. so other than health care, i do not see much happening. >> i think it will not happen. and here's why. no major national political figure has attacked affirmative action publicly since 1996 or before. it isind of remarkable. the republicans who, during the 1990's for a while, we're seeing some sort of political profit attacking affirmative action given the polls don't do
of confidence in the economy. everybody's saying, yeah, things feel better, but it's not perfect yet. >> also, there's no urgency. the fed is telling us rates are going to stay at rock bottom until 2015. i don't have to rush into the market now. >> that and the fact your house is worth now what it was in 2004 before the few years of psycho fraud happened. people aren't saying buy, buy, buy because this is a super investment and it's going to go up 10% a year. yeah, people are waiting for the right house. there's people i've had as buyers who have waited a year to find the right house. yeah, they paid a little more for it, but it was worth the wait. people are picky too. >> diana, there's just no urgency. >> no urgency. i was just talking to an investor today. he was talking about this fundamental shift in attitudes toward homeownership. it's just not what it used to be. a lot of potential buyers out there are saying i can rent a single family home and even though, you know, home sale prices are lower and affordability is supposedly better, i don't have to deal with a mortgage. i don't have to
and responsible budget. >> the package includes public spending cuts of 10 billion euros. france's economy is in a precarious position. second quarter gdp was stagnant, and unemployment has just talked 3 million -- topped 3 million. the government is aiming to make good on election promises while making sure austerity does not hit france into recession -- tip france into recession. >> spanish banks will need 59 billion euros to get back on their feet according to a new report commissioned by the spanish government. >> that will help take pressure off the prime minister, who is seeking to avoid a bailout. spain says they will ask for around 40 billion euros of the total sum, while the rest may be able to be raised by the banks themselves. the european commission welcomed the results. >> let's take a look at markets. european shares were on a bit of a roller coaster ride this friday. after moving higher in early trading, that ultimately finished the week on a down note. our correspondent sent us this summary from frankfurt. >> spain remains in the focus of international investors, also here
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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